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Contemporary Classics with Marsha Bansavage Monday, Dec 4 at 7:00pm

Contemporary Classics with Marsha Bansavage evenings at 7:00pm

The book chat selections have been made for September through December 2017.

Tuesday, September 5th – All Over but the Shoutin’ by Rick Bragg.
Image Credit: Syndetics

“A gripping account of people struggling to make sense and solidity of life’s capricious promises. As he tells the wrenching story of his own family’s life in the dirt-poor Alabama hills–where he got out, but has never been quite about to leave–Bragg attempts to both atone for and to avenge the mistakes and cruelties of his past.”
(Syndetics)

 

Monday, October 2nd – Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance.
Image Credit: Syndetics

“The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history. A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.”
(Syndetics)

Wednesday, November 1st – The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje.
Image Credit: Syndetics

“With unsettling beauty and intelligence, Michael Ondaatje’s Booker Prize-winning novel traces the intersection of four damaged lives in an abandoned Italian villa at the end of World War II.The nurse Hana, exhausted by death, obsessively tends to her last surviving patient. Caravaggio, the thief, tries to reimagine who he is, now that his hands are hopelessly maimed. The Indian sapper Kip searches for hidden bombs in a landscape where nothing is safe but himself. And at the center of his labyrinth lies the English patient, nameless and hideously burned, a man who is both a riddle and a provocation to his companions—and whose memories of suffering, rescue, and betrayal illuminate this book like flashes of heat lightning. ”
(Amazon)

Monday, December 4th – Wonder by R. J. Palacio
Image Credit: Syndetics

“August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid–but his new classmates can’t get past Auggie’s extraordinary face. Wonder begins from Auggie’s point of view, but soon switches to include his classmates, his sister, her boyfriend, and others. These perspectives converge in a portrait of one community’s struggle with empathy, compassion, and acceptance. R.J. Palacio has called her debut novel “a meditation on kindness” –indeed, every reader will come away with a greater appreciation for the simple courage of friendship. Auggie is a hero to root for, a diamond in the rough who proves that you can’t blend in when you were born to stand out”
(Syndetics)

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